Preservation Work at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier

For 100 years, Arlington National Cemetery’s staff have worked to maintain and preserve the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, ensuring that future generations can pay their respects to the nameless – but not forgotten – soldiers who fought for freedom. In anticipation of the Centennial Observance of the burial of the Unknown Soldier today – Veterans Day, November 11, 2021 – we are sharing a look at the preservation work that has been ongoing since 2016.

Historic Trades at work

Historical architects and carpenters from the National Park Service’s Historic Preservation Training Center (HPTC) focused on preserving the windows and associated hardware at the Amphitheater. In 2016, the architects surveyed the condition of all the windows and doors and specified what repairs needed to be made. Carpenters worked diligently to return the windows to their original design, making them weather-tight and functional.

The Campaign for Historic Trades is a partnership with the National Park Service’s Historic Preservation Training Center in Frederick, Md, from where important preservation work like this is often dispatched or completed.

HPTC masons repaired the ledger stones at the base of the Tomb in what is known as the Plaza Area, specifically the two memorial ground tablets associated with unknown soldiers from other conflicts, WWII (1941-45), and Korea (1950-53) and several of the surrounding plaza stones.

Below is a video from Arlington National Cemetery on the restoration and conservation of the Tomb of the Unknown Solider.

The Campaign thanks our country’s veterans for their service.