The Trades

The Campaign for Historic Trades increases opportunities for all Americans to enter the high-demand field of skilled traditional trades.

Apprenticeship Opportunities

What are Historic Trades?

The Campaign for Historic Trades promotes skills related to the construction of the historic built environment. This inherently encompasses a broad spectrum of jobs and specialties. Apprentices and trainees can follow a generalist path or specialize in a craft.  

Carpentry

Skilled carpenters assess wood features, make recommendations for repairs, and use techniques to blend the new fabric with the old, all while documenting the work they complete.  Carpenters need a firm grasp of construction math and an understanding of structural engineering. 

Woodcrafting

Woodcrafters combine preservation carpentry with traditional woodworking to restore and replicate architectural features that include windows, doors, columns, and many other components found on and inside historic structures.  Woodcrafters need to be literate in construction math, and learn about wood science to inform their work.

Finishing

A finisher applies final coats of different materials on a variety of substrates.  This includes painting, sealants, stains, and washes.  Finishers study and learn about chemistry, material science, and application techniques.  They research and recreate historic finishes. 

Masonry

Preservation masons take extra steps to blend repairs with existing stone, concrete or brick. The process includes analyzing the mortar and finding appropriate materials to match mortar.  Masonry is a general categorization.  Different specialized under this umbrella can include brickwork, stonework, plastering, and tiling, among others.  Preservation masons need to be dexterous and learn material science to understand different mortars and masonry units.

Metalworking

Metalworkers manipulate metals into structural, functional, and decorative aspects of structures.  Metalworkers forge, weld, solder, smelt, and cast metals into roofs, monuments, beams, fencing and rails, and decorative features.  It requires extensive knowledge of metallurgy and material sciences, as well as strong technical skills to manipulate the metal.

Glazier

A glazier works on the glazing of fenestrations.  In layman’s terms, glaziers repair, clean, and replace the glass features on a building.  This can include standard windows and doors, as well as stained-glass elements.  It requires familiarity with multiple materials and an understanding of various operating systems.

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Get Involved

Historic trades offer a breadth of career opportunities.  Working professionals and tradespeople can augment and specialize their skill sets.  Young people and career transitioners can train with skilled masters, learning to use both hands and mind.  Take the next step.

Get Involved

Placement & Salary

Careers 

Historic Trades encompass a wide sector of jobs.  Trainees can follow career paths in: 

  • Maintenance  
  • Masonry 
  • Metalworking 
  • Glazier 
  • Roofing 
  • Public History 
  • Architecture 
  • Engineering 
  • Conservation 
  • General Contracting 

Salaries 

2019 median salaries in construction trades ranged from $36,000 for unskilled labor to $48,000 for skilled carpenters. 

Related historic trades positions at the National Park Service range from custodial work to exhibit specialist.  The 2018 median pay for these positions was $34,000 and $78,000 respectively.

How to Apply

The Associated General Contractors of America reported that 81% of contractors struggled to find qualified skilled labor in 2019.   

 

Historic Trades do not have special job classifications within construction.  Without this, job and career data can only be deduced from construction industries as a whole.  Industry is trying to resolve labor shortages through technology and mechanization.  However, restoration cannot be robotized.  Human discretion and tactical skills will always be needed in historic preservation projects.  America’s historic building stock increases every year, as does the value of skilled labor.  Historic trades offer job and economic security.